Risk-Driven Compliant Access Controls for Clouds

AI-generated keywords: Cloud Computing Cost Savings Security Regulatory Compliance Risk-Driven Compliant Access Controls

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Benefits of cloud computing: cost savings and increased agility
  • Security and regulatory compliance concerns hinder adoption
  • Public clouds are commonly used but can create conflicts when exchanging private data due to multiple jurisdictions with varying degrees of harmonization
  • Measurable solutions specific to cloud contexts are needed for managing regulatory compliance
  • "Risk-Driven Compliant Access Controls for Clouds" proposes an approach that begins with a conceptual model of explicit regulatory requirements for exchanging private data in multijurisdictional environments
  • Metrics for non-compliance or risks to compliance would be integrated into standard data access-control policies and checked at policy analysis time before decisions regarding data access are made
  • This approach could help organizations using cloud technology better manage regulatory compliance risks associated with the exchange of private data across multiple jurisdictions while also addressing security concerns
  • The authors argue that such an approach could increase acceptance and adoption of cloud computing by addressing ongoing challenges related to security and regulatory compliance concerns.
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Authors: Hanene Boussi Rahmouni, Kamran Munir, Mohammed Odeh, Richard McClatchey

9 pages, 3 figures. International Arab Conference on Information Technology (ACIT 2011) / Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. December 2012

Abstract: There is widespread agreement that cloud computing have proven cost cutting and agility benefits. However, security and regulatory compliance issues are continuing to challenge the wide acceptance of such technology both from social and commercial stakeholders. An important facture behind this is the fact that clouds and in particular public clouds are usually deployed and used within broad geographical or even international domains. This implies that the exchange of private and other protected data within the cloud environment would be governed by multiple jurisdictions. These jurisdictions have a great degree of harmonisation; however, they present possible conflicts that are hard to negotiate at run time. So far, important efforts were played in order to deal with regulatory compliance management for large distributed systems. However, measurable solutions are required for the context of cloud. In this position paper, we are suggesting an approach that starts with a conceptual model of explicit regulatory requirements for exchanging private data on a multijurisdictional environment and build on it in order to define metrics for non-compliance or, in other terms, risks to compliance. These metrics will be integrated within usual data access-control policies and will be checked at policy analysis time before a decision to allow/deny the data access is made.

Submitted to arXiv on 24 Feb. 2012

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1202.5482v2

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The benefits of cloud computing are widely acknowledged for their cost savings and increased agility. However, security and regulatory compliance concerns from both social and commercial stakeholders still hinder its adoption. Public clouds, which are commonly used, are deployed across broad geographical or even international domains. This can create conflicts when exchanging private and protected data due to multiple jurisdictions with varying degrees of harmonization. Significant efforts have been made to manage regulatory compliance for large distributed systems but measurable solutions specific to cloud contexts are needed. In the position paper titled "Risk-Driven Compliant Access Controls for Clouds," authors Hanene Boussi Rahmouni, Kamran Munir, Mohammed Odeh, and Richard McClatchey propose an approach that begins with a conceptual model of explicit regulatory requirements for exchanging private data in multijurisdictional environments. They then build on this model to define metrics for non-compliance or risks to compliance which would be integrated into standard data access-control policies and checked at policy analysis time before decisions regarding data access are made. This approach could help organizations using cloud technology better manage regulatory compliance risks associated with the exchange of private data across multiple jurisdictions while also addressing security concerns. The authors argue that such an approach could increase acceptance and adoption of cloud computing by addressing ongoing challenges related to security and regulatory compliance concerns.
Created on 26 Apr. 2023

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