Nonperturbative Effects on the Ferromagnetic Transition in Repulsive Fermi Gases

AI-generated keywords: Phase Transitions Fermi Gases Repulsive Interactions Nonperturbative Effects Quantum Monte Carlo

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  • Dilute spin-1/2 Fermi gases with repulsive interactions can undergo a ferromagnetic phase transition to a spin-polarized state at a critical gas parameter $(k_{\rm F}a)_c$
  • Previous theoretical predictions of the ferromagnetic phase transition have been based on perturbation theory, which treats the gas parameter as a small number
  • Belitz, Kirkpatrick, and Vojta (BKV) argued that the phase transition in clean itinerant ferromagnets is generically of first order at low temperatures due to correlation effects that lead to nonanalytic terms in the free energy
  • Lianyi He and Xu-Guang Huang study the nonperturbative effects on the ferromagnetic phase transition by summing particle-particle ladder diagrams to all orders in the gas parameter
  • They consider a universal repulsive Fermi gas where effective range effects can be neglected, which can be realized experimentally in a two-component Fermi gas of $^6$Li atoms by using a nonadiabatic field switch to the upper branch of a Feshbach resonance with a positive s-wave scattering length
  • Their theory predicts that the ferromagnetic transition in dilute Fermi gases is possibly a counterexample to the BKV argument. The predicted critical gas parameter $(k_{\rm F}a)_c=0.858$ is found to be in good agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo results $(k_{\rm F}a)_c=0.86$ for nearly zero-range potentials [S. Pilati et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 030405 (2010)]
  • They compare their predicted spin susceptibility with quantum Monte Carlo results and find good agreement between them
  • The authors' findings suggest that the ferromagnetic phase transition in dilute Fermi gases is likely to be a second-order phase transition rather than first order as previously suggested by BKV's argument at low temperatures due to correlation effects leading to nonanalytic terms in free energy calculations
  • This study highlights the importance of considering nonperturbative effects when studying phase transitions in dilute Fermi gases with repulsive interactions and provides evidence against BKV's argument regarding first order transitions at low temperatures for these systems.
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Authors: Lianyi He, Xu-Guang Huang

Phys. Rev. A 85, 043624 (2012)
arXiv: 1106.1345v4 - DOI (cond-mat.stat-mech)
11 pages + 7 figures, more references added, version published in Physical Review A

Abstract: It is generally believed that a dilute spin-1/2 Fermi gas with repulsive interactions can undergo a ferromagnetic phase transition to a spin-polarized state at a critical gas parameter $(k_{\rm F}a)_c$. Previous theoretical predictions of the ferromagnetic phase transition have been based on the perturbation theory, which treats the gas parameter as a small number. On the other hand, Belitz, Kirkpatrick, and Vojta (BKV) have argued that the phase transition in clean itinerant ferromagnets is generically of first order at low temperatures, due to the correlation effects that lead to a nonanalytic term in the free energy. The second-order perturbation theory predicts a first-order phase transition at $(k_{\rm F}a)_c=1.054$, consistent with the BKV argument. However, since the critical gas parameter is expected to be of order O(1), perturbative predictions may be unreliable. In this paper we study the nonperturbative effects on the ferromagnetic phase transition by summing the particle-particle ladder diagrams to all orders in the gas parameter. We consider a universal repulsive Fermi gas where the effective range effects can be neglected, which can be realized in a two-component Fermi gas of $^6$Li atoms by using a nonadiabatic field switch to the upper branch of a Feshbach resonance with a positive s-wave scattering length. Our theory predicts a second-order phase transition, which indicates that ferromagnetic transition in dilute Fermi gases is possibly a counterexample to the BKV argument. The predicted critical gas parameter $(k_{\rm F}a)_c=0.858$ is in good agreement with the recent quantum Monte Carlo result $(k_{\rm F}a)_c=0.86$ for a nearly zero-range potential [S. Pilati, \emph{et al}., Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf 105}, 030405 (2010)]. We also compare the spin susceptibility with the quantum Monte Carlo result and find good agreement.

Submitted to arXiv on 07 Jun. 2011

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The study of phase transitions in dilute spin-1/2 Fermi gases with repulsive interactions has been a topic of interest for many years. It is believed that such gases can undergo a ferromagnetic phase transition to a spin-polarized state at a critical gas parameter $(k_{\rm F}a)_c$. Previous theoretical predictions of the ferromagnetic phase transition have been based on perturbation theory, which treats the gas parameter as a small number. However, it has been argued by Belitz, Kirkpatrick, and Vojta (BKV) that the phase transition in clean itinerant ferromagnets is generically of first order at low temperatures due to correlation effects that lead to nonanalytic terms in the free energy. In this paper, Lianyi He and Xu-Guang Huang study the nonperturbative effects on the ferromagnetic phase transition by summing particle-particle ladder diagrams to all orders in the gas parameter. They consider a universal repulsive Fermi gas where effective range effects can be neglected, which can be realized experimentally in a two-component Fermi gas of $^6$Li atoms by using a nonadiabatic field switch to the upper branch of a Feshbach resonance with a positive s-wave scattering length. Their theory predicts that the ferromagnetic transition in dilute Fermi gases is possibly a counterexample to the BKV argument. The predicted critical gas parameter $(k_{\rm F}a)_c=0.858$ is found to be in good agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo results $(k_{\rm F}a)_c=0.86$ for nearly zero-range potentials [S. Pilati et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 030405 (2010)]. Additionally, they compare their predicted spin susceptibility with quantum Monte Carlo results and find good agreement between them. The authors' findings suggest that the ferromagnetic phase transition in dilute Fermi gases is likely to be a second-order phase transition rather than first order as previously suggested by BKV's argument at low temperatures due to correlation effects leading to nonanalytic terms in free energy calculations. This study highlights the importance of considering nonperturbative effects when studying phase transitions in dilute Fermi gases with repulsive interactions and provides evidence against BKV's argument regarding first order transitions at low temperatures for these systems.
Created on 11 Apr. 2023

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