Endogenous circannual rhythm in LH secretion: insight from signal analysis coupled with mathematical modelling

AI-generated keywords: Reproduction Photoperiod Melatonin LH secretion Mathematical modeling

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Sheep reproduction is timed by the annual photoperiodic cycle characterized by changes in daylength
  • Photoperiodic information is translated into a circadian profile of melatonin secretion that impacts GnRH secretion, which controls ovarian cyclicity
  • The pattern of GnRH secretion is mirrored into that of LH secretion, whose plasmatic level can be easily measured
  • The authors investigate whether there exists an endogenous circannual rhythm in LH secretion in a tropical sheep population that exhibits clear seasonal ovarian activity when subjected to temperate latitudes
  • The authors used time-frequency signal processing methods and designed a mathematical model of LH plasmatic level accounting for the effect of experimental sampling times to extract hidden rhythms from the data
  • Their findings reveal the existence of an endogenous circannual rhythm and shed light on the action mechanism of photoperiod on the pulsatile pattern of LH secretion (control of interpulse interval)
  • The high frequency component observed in their signals is mainly due to the experimental sampling protocol
  • This study provides valuable insights into how photoperiod influences reproductive cycles in sheep
  • Importance of considering experimental design when analyzing hormonal time series data
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Authors: Alexandre Vidal, Claire Médigue, Benoit Malpaux, Frédérique Clément

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Series A 367, 1908 (2009) 4759-4777
arXiv: 0903.1698v1 - DOI (math.DS)

Abstract: In sheep as in many vertebrates, the seasonal pattern of reproduction is timed by the annual photoperiodic cycle, characterized by seasonal changes in the daylength. The photoperiodic information is translated into a circadian profile of melatonin secretion. After multiple neuronal relays (within the hypothalamus), melatonin impacts GnRH (gonadotrophin releasing hormone) secretion that in turn controls ovarian cyclicity. The pattern of GnRH secretion is mirrored into that of LH (luteinizing hormone) secretion, whose plasmatic level can be easily measured. We addressed the question of whether there exists an endogenous circannual rhythm in a tropical sheep population that exhibits clear seasonal ovarian activity when ewes are subjected to temperate latitudes. We based our analysis on LH time series collected in the course of 3 years from ewes subjected to a constant photoperiodic regime. Due to intra- and inter- animal variability and unequal sampling times, the existence of an endogenous rhythm is not straightforward. We have used time-frequency signal processing methods to extract hidden rhythms from the data. To further investigate the LF (low frequency) and HF (high frequency) components of the signals, we have designed a mathematical model of LH plasmatic level accounting for the effect of experimental sampling times. The model enables us to confirm the existence of an endogenous circannual rhythm, to investigate the action mechanism of photoperiod on the pulsatile pattern of LH secretion (control of the interpulse interval) and to conclude that the HF component is mainly due to the experimental sampling protocol.

Submitted to arXiv on 10 Mar. 2009

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 0903.1698v1

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The seasonal pattern of reproduction in sheep, as in many vertebrates, is timed by the annual photoperiodic cycle characterized by changes in daylength. This photoperiodic information is translated into a circadian profile of melatonin secretion that impacts gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which controls ovarian cyclicity. The pattern of GnRH secretion is mirrored into that of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, whose plasmatic level can be easily measured. In this study, the authors investigate whether there exists an endogenous circannual rhythm in LH secretion in a tropical sheep population that exhibits clear seasonal ovarian activity when subjected to temperate latitudes. The authors based their analysis on LH time series collected over three years from ewes subjected to a constant photoperiodic regime. Due to intra- and inter-animal variability and unequal sampling times, the existence of an endogenous rhythm was not straightforward. To extract hidden rhythms from the data, they used time-frequency signal processing methods and designed a mathematical model of LH plasmatic level accounting for the effect of experimental sampling times. Their findings reveal the existence of an endogenous circannual rhythm and shed light on the action mechanism of photoperiod on the pulsatile pattern of LH secretion (control of interpulse interval). They also conclude that the high frequency component observed in their signals is mainly due to the experimental sampling protocol. This study provides valuable insights into how photoperiod influences reproductive cycles in sheep and highlights the importance of considering experimental design when analyzing hormonal time series data. The authors' approach combining signal processing techniques with mathematical modeling provides a powerful tool for investigating complex physiological systems such as those involved in reproductive cycles.
Created on 03 Jun. 2023

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